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Frank Ocean's Dad Calvin Cooksey Sues Russell Simmons For God Money After Portrayal As Terrible Father

by   Sep 14, 2014 13:32 PM EDT

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Calvin Cooksey doesn't appear to have much of a case, but he's demanding $142 million in a defamation lawsuit against hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons.

The father of R&B singer Frank Ocean claims that Simmons' website posted disparaging remarks against Cooksey, according to TMZ. Here's the kicker, though: Cooksey is also upset because Simmons never actually used his name in the posts (talk about tearing down your case before it begins).

The "singer, writer and inventor" wants his king's ransom for "loss of future income" on the grounds that Simmons "published lies about him without checking facts."

A quick search of Global Grind — Simmons' offending website — did not turn up much more than a reference to Ocean's "absent father" in a song review.

Cooksey has not been in Ocean's life since the boy was five years old, but he blames Ocean's "Money Grubbing mother" for hiding his son from him.

While all of this is going down, Ocean is presumably still working on the highly-anticipated follow-up to 2012's Channel Orange.

In late August, he was sued — along with Kanye West and Jay-Zfor copyright infringement over their song "Made In America."

Joel McDonald says that they used his song of the same name in the making of their own.

McDonald, a musician from New York, is seeking $3 million in damages.

But this was nothing new for Hova and 'Ye. In 2011, they were sued by soul musician Syl Johnson for sampling his song "Different Strokes" without permission for "The Joy."  

Representatives for the rappers denied the allegations, however, they did acknowledge that the song was released prior to Watch the Throne.

It has been reported that Jay Z and West cited federal copyright law in their defense. They claimed that because the song was made before 1972 (when the law was enacted regarding covers), they were legally able to use it.

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