March 23, 2018 / 4:51 AM

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Chainsmokers’ ‘You Owe Me’ Video Starts With Ordinary Tasks, Ends With Vampiric Carnage


Kim Dotcom Good Life music video

The Chainsmokers just released their new song, "You Owe Me," on Friday, Feb. 16. The duo also dropped the official music video for the track on the same day.

The three-minute clip opens with Alex Pall throwing out trash. The next scene cuts to Andrew Taggart vacuuming the floor while singing the words to their new song. On his way back to the house, Pall notices a stain on the stairs. He goes inside and walks past Taggart, who is still singing, and goes out again to clean the stain.

In the next scene, Taggart is standing behind the kitchen sink, washing some dishes. Pall is busy preparing food for their guests. The rest of the music video features the two singers doing some chores, which includes ironing clothes, mopping, and more.

Midway through the video, Pall and Taggart's friends arrive and they all dine together. All of a sudden, the pleasant feast turns gory when Pall and Taggart transform into vampires. They start biting the necks of their guests and munching on some of their body parts.

While Pall is fixing the mess inside the house, Taggart once again stands in front of the door and starts mopping the floor. Both of their faces are covered in blood. Pall gets out of the house and throws the trash into the bin.

The music video for "You Owe Me" was directed by Rory Kramer. The track follows last month's hit song "Sick Boy." There are speculations suggesting that The Chainsmokers will veer away from their starry-eyed bangers like "Closer" and "Something Just Like This." The duo may release darker music in the coming months.

Alex Pall's Controversial Statement

Last year, the duo talked about their success and how it comes with more responsibility. During a previous interview, Pall said that even before they became successful, [expletive] was his number one priority. This statement was taken out of context, and the 32-year-old musician said that he learned something from what happened.

"It affects you, because you don't know how people are going to see that -- [whether they'll] take it at face value and walk away feeling you are that person. It's not about apologizing and back-pedaling. It's about... I don't want to say becoming better people, because that sounds cheesy. Just keeping it real, and understanding that not everyone's on your team," said Pall.

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