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NBC Making TV Sequel To 'Say Anything' Unless Cameron Crowe, John Cusack Can Stop It

by Shawn Christ   Oct 7, 2014 16:25 PM EDT

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NBC announced that it would be bringing a follow-up series to the Cameron Crowe-directed 1989 classic Say Anything to the small screen yesterday (Oct. 6), which didn't sit well with the director or leading man John Cusack

Deadline broke the news about the possible sequel, set to take place a full decade after the events in the movie, before Crowe even knew any details.

"Regarding the announcement of a "Say Anything" tv show... @JohnCusack, @IoneSkye1 and I have no involvement...except in trying to stop it," Crowe tweeted early this morning (Oct. 7).

Cusack, who played boombox-holding Lloyd Dobler in the film, shared a similar sentiment. "No end to the exploitation of other people's sincere efforts in shameless slime," he wrote. Actress Ione Skye, who played Dobler's love interest Diane Court, has yet to comment on the project. 

Apparently 20th Century Fox TV tried to reach out to Crowe, but there was a communication breakdown that led to him not being informed. As Deadline points out in their follow-up story, NBC and Fox are legally allowed to make the show, but generally companies don't go ahead without the creators' blessings. 

Say Anything was Crowe's directorial debut and took place over one summer when Dobler, an underachiever, and Court, a valedictorian, fall for each other before college. Roger Ebert gave the film four stars.

"Say Anything depends above all on the human qualities of its actors," the critic wrote. "Cusack and Skye must have been cast for their clear-eyed frankness, for their ability to embody the burning intensity of young idealism. A movie like this is possible because its maker believes in the young characters, and in doing the right thing, and in staying true to oneself. The sad teenage comedies of recent years are apparently made by filmmakers who have little respect for themselves or their characters, and sneer because they dare not dream."

Do you want to see the story go to television or do you side with Cusack and Crowe? Sound off in the comments section below!

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