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Marc Anthony Talks New Album "Vivir Mi Vida" and the Future of Salsa Music

by Caitlin Carter   Sep 3, 2013 13:35 PM EDT

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Marc Anthony is nine stops in on his "Vivir La Vida Tour." He played to a sold-out crowd for his first U.S. stop on the tour, and his shows have been receiving raving reviews.

"It was a riveting, relentless tour de force that cemented Anthony's stature as one of the preeminent performers of his generation," Billboard reported. "Few acts today that can match his vocal prowess and showmanship. Anthony likes to prowl the stage, arms flung wide, head thrown back. It's a grand gesture for so slight a man, and yet, it envelops entire arenas."

It appears that "3.0," his first salsa album since 2004's "Valio La Pena," is living up to its hype.

In Saturday's article on Latina.com, Anthony explains why it has taken him so long to put out another salsa album, what the process was like and how his music fits in the context of modern salsa.

He told Latina.com that his recording process takes a long time due to his philosophy of making music.

"I like living with the ideas of a song for a long time before I even go to the studio, but I truly feel that this was the right time, and I'm very happy with the final product," he told them. "I called the album '3.0' as a kind of reflection of the language often used among friends on social media to define the 'next level.'"

He also explains why he chose "Vivir Mi Vida" as the first single on the album, calling it a "so positive and such an homage to life."

The fact that Anthony is successful, even during a time when the popularity of salsa music is declining (Billboard reported a 14% decrease compared to the first half of last year) is a testament to his impact on the genre in its modern form.

"Salsa has always been there," he told them. "I do my part by touring pretty much all year round. Audiences react to it everywhere you go. I think the genre is in a good place. We just need to continue to carry that torch with the respect that it deserves and to keep delivering good music. I remember working on the production of [and American-Idol-type show] and discovering so much salsa talent-no doubt the legacy will be carried on by some of them."

Part of the reason he has managed to stay relevant even with salsa hiatuses lasting almost a decade is that he takes serious pride in each album releases. He tells Latina, "I've always presented my music from a universal place versus presenting my music only to Latin audiences because it's in Spanish. I'm a true believer that quality rules over quantity and that's the way I've done everything in my life. I strive to maintain the essence of who I am as an artist instead of wanting to sound like everyone else because it's the next big thing."

With 34 dates left on his tour (eight of them in the U.S.), fans will see just what Anthony has been up to with "3.0."

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