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Sinead O’Connor and Ava Cherry Cover David Bowie at Metro Chicago Cancer Benefit [WATCH]

by Alexandria Wojcik   Mar 7, 2016 21:34 PM EST

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Sinead O'Connor covered David Bowie during a powerful tribute performance at a concert that doubled as a benefit for cancer research at the Metro in Chicago over the weekend. The sold-out, one-off show also featured Ava Cherry and support from the Chicago-based, nine-piece Bowie cover band, Sons of the Silent Age.

O'Connor stunned the crowd--which is audibly excited in the fan-shot footage that has surfaced from the event--with her own renditions of "Life On Mars?" from 1971's Hunky Dory and the lesser known song, "Sorrow," originally by The McCoys, which appeared on Bowie's 1973 covers album, Pin Ups. Watch clips of the Irish singer-songwriter's performance below.

Before O'Connor took the stage, Cherry performed vivacious covers of Aladdin Sane track "The Jean Genie" and "Young Americans" from the 1975 album of the same name. The singer/model, most famously known as Ziggy Stardust's former backup singer and ex-girlfriend, is featured on Young Americans as part of a trio along with Robin Clark and Luther Vandross.

Cherry also performed her own single, "That's How Loneliness Goes," SPIN reports. Watch her performance via fan-shot footage below.

The Sons of the Silent Age, who took their name from the Heroes track of the same name, performed classic cuts from the Thin White Duke for nearly three hours, Consequence of Sound reports. For most of the evening, the band focused on tracks from 1976's Station to Station as well as some deeper cuts.

The concert was not only paying homage to Bowie, who died in January after battling cancer, but was also celebrating the historic venue's founder and perennial fixture of the Chicago music scene, Joe Shanahan, who recently overcame his own fight with tongue cancer.

Thomas Gajewski, director of the cancer and immunology program at the University of Chicago's cancer research center, kicked-off the event with a speech. He explained that the proceeds raised would fund advances in immunotherapy cancer treatment, Billboard reports.

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