Members of the community came together in GLAAD's "Together in Pride: You Are Not Alone," in support of LGBTQ centers involved in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic on Sunday, April 26.

All proceeds from the two-hour event hosted by American comedian Billy Eichner and Canadian actress Lilly Singh will go to CenterLink, a community of LGBTQ centers across the country. From celebrity performances and meaningful interviews about living in the middle of quarantine, here are some of the most outstanding moments in GLAAD's "Together in Pride" special event.

Melissa Etheridge's "Pulse" and Closes Show With "Come to My Window"

The Leavenworth-native country icon Melissa Etheridge went straight to the heart with her 2016 single "Pulse," named after the gay nightclub where the tragic Orlando shooting incident took place. As she started plucking the intro, she reminded everyone how "everybody has a heartbeat, everybody has a pulse."

Rainbow
(Photo: GLAAD Twitter Page)
Kesha retweeted the GLAAD announcement for the live-streamed event, she was among the last performers with an encouraging rendition of "Rainbow."

Playing from her studio filled with awards and artworks, Etheridge sang the timely and relevant chorus "I am human, I am love/And my heart beats with my blood/Love will always win/Underneath the skin/Everybody's got a pulse."

Before the Pride event ended, Etheridge delivered a fitting closure with "Come to My Window." The 58-year-old sings with the same raspy, smoky vocals almost the same as she did when the single first came out in 1993.

Bryan Michael Smith Interviews Dr. Darrion Sutton

Queen Sugar's Toine Wilkins, Bryan Michael Smith, sat down with New York medical professional Dr. Darrion Sutton to shed light on how the global coronavirus pandemic affects communities of color. Dr. Sutton said that New York is now looking at the "light at the end of tunnel," with the cases now stabilizing.

Brian Michael Smith and Dr. Darrien Sutton
(Photo: GLAAD Twitter Page)
Actor Brian Michael Smith interviews NY-based Dr. Darrien Sutton to shed light on other issues making the coronavirus battle a tougher one than it should be.

Dr. Sutton also noted that Queens had the most number of cases because of its proximity to LaGuardia Airport and the JFK International Airport, and insufficient facilities, noting that Queens has the least number of beds per 1,000 patients.

Smith asked about Dr. Sutton's around-the-clock experience as a frontline responder and his experience in the FDA restrictions preventing gay and bisexuals from donating blood and plasma - among the much needed resources in the midst of the coronavirus battle - and describing the restriction as an "archaic" practice.

Alex Newell Covers Destiny's Child's "Stand Up For Love"

Alex Eugene Newell, American actress-singer best known for her role as Unique Adams in the Fox musical "Glee," performed Destiny's Child's 2005 anthem "Stand Up For Love." Dressed in yellow, with only a microphone in front of her, she gave an intimate bar-like performance. 

Stand Up For Love
(Photo: GLAAD Twitter Page)
Alex Newell delivers a powerful performance of a Destiny Child hit, "Stand Up For Love," during GLAAD's "Together in Pride" event.

Starting with a restrained first verse, Newell put her vocal prowess for all to see by effortlessly belting the high notes with clarity, The young 27-year-old artist gave justice to the Destiny Child hit, without breaking a sweat.

Kesha Invites Us To "Put Those Colors On" With "Rainbow" Performance

As the show moved toward the end, a welcome performance from Kesha gave the viewers a positive takeaway. With a rainbow-patterned sweatshirt, a collage of different artworks as a backdrop, Kesha told everyone to "put those colors on, girl/ come and play along with me tonight" has taken a literal and figurative meaning.

Rainbow
(Photo: Kesha's Twitter Page)
Kesha invites everyone to put those colors on with her soulful rendition of "Rainbow" during the GLAAD live-streamed event.

Kesha deliversed an intimate and soulful number, which she originally wrote when she was in rehab because of an eating disorder. As the rainbow comes after the storm, her "Rainbow" was a promise of things getting better - a much-needed reminder in the middle of quarantine.