November 24, 2017 / 2:12 AM

Stay Connected

Raising Awareness: Classical Musicians Commissioned for Little to No Pay as Industry Lowballs Their Talents

by Ian Holubiak   Aug 23, 2014 09:19 AM EDT

Close
Who is Alton Sterling?

Being a musician is commonly known to be a daunting career choice. Maintaining an art form, actually, of any medium, and sustaining oneself is harder than anyone can truly imagine--and this now endangers classical musicians trying to make a buck with their original compositions according to Sound and Music.

Per an article at The Guardian, classical composers who are commissioned to work nowadays are getting shorted on their checks as people who inquire for their work are usually lowballed for their talents.

Anyone who's been around the music circuit can understand that the amount of time and energy spent in coining a new composition of any kind no easy task. With the physical and emotional toll it takes to continue prolificacy as a working musician, it should be a duty to bring awareness to bring this growing issue to light.

Via a posted report, some key findings include:

• 66% of the 466 composers who responded stated they do not find commissions to be a significant proportion of their income. Given that the respondents had an average of 2.65 commissions in 2013 with an average fee per commission of £1,392 it's easy to see why.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING

Real Time Analytics