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READ: Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Fails to Reach Contract Agreements, Spano's Band Facing Lockout and Cancellation of 2014-15 Season

by Ian Holubiak   Sep 11, 2014 09:45 AM EDT

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The status of orchestras across the nation seem to remain steeped in perpetual turmoil. The Metropolitan Opera avoided a lockout, but now the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's Saturday night deadline passed without a new contract agreement. This could mean a lockout to could ensue.

Two years ago, musicians in the ASO were required to take a $14,000 pay cut to help cover a growing deficit of $1.5 million. It was ensured that this was a one-off sacrifice but now the orchestra is being asked for further forfeitures.

The management, Stanley Romanstein, posted a deficit of $2,786,000 in 2013, which was nearly twice as much as the predicted $1.5 million. Romanstein is demanding musicians relinquish their jobs and health care to pay for shortcomings.

Statements were posted by each side and were posted to Access Atlanta early Sunday morning.

The Players Association statement:

Atlanta, GA September 7, 2014 12:01AM

As of midnight September 7th, 2014, ASO President and CEO Stanley Romanstein had refused all requests to meet with the Musicians during the final hours before the 2012-2014 CBA expired, forcing them to submit their most recent proposal electronically. The Musicians emphasized in their proposal that they wish to avoid a labor dispute and propose to continue negotiating while working under the concessionary 2012-14 contract. The musicians have received no response; it appears that the Woodruff Arts Center has locked out the Musicians of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for the second time in as many years.

In over eight months of negotiations, the Woodruff Arts Center and ASO Managements have displayed no willingness to find a workable agreement. They have refused to meet in person during the final days before our existing contract expired, and obstinately cling to the concessionary terms of their "last, best, and final offer," under which the musicians would continue to hemorrhage income and lose orchestra positions.

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