November 19, 2017 / 12:43 PM

Stay Connected

Nas, Alice Cooper, and Bob Weir will be stars of Tribeca Film Festival music documentaries

Close
Rock and roll legend Fats Domino dies

SXSW is incorporating more music-based movies than ever into its lineup this year, and film festivals are looking to do the same thing. The Tribeca Film Festival, scheduled for April 16 through 27, will feature a number of promising music documentaries on its schedule this year. Check them out: 

Time Is Illmatic (directed by One9)

Rapper Nas' classic album The Illmatic will celebrate its 20th anniversary on April 19, a few days after this documentary on the creation of the album will debut at Tribeca. Nas will perform the entirety of the album following the screening, making it the second year a musical act has performed after a documentary based on them has opened the festival. The National performed last year following a screening of Mistaken for Strangers

Super Duper Alice Cooper (directed by Reginald Harkema, Scot McFayden and Sam Dunn) 

This doc will tell the life story of heavy metal icon Alice Cooper, complemented by plenty of old footage and interviews. Cooper seems like the world's most likable dude now, but his stage theatrics brought him Marilyn Manson-esque notoriety during the more conservative '70s. His attitude toward censorship has had a far bigger effect of culture than his music. 

The Other One: The Long, Strange Trip of Bob Weir (directed by Mike Fleiss)

Few acts are as ripe for documentaries as the Grateful Dead (thanks to thousands of hours worth of live footage) and few rockers are as ripe for documentaries as the ever-interesting Bob Weir, the band's rhythm guitarist. Weir and The Dead had immeasurable influence on all jam bands, and even rockers that don't jam. Those influencees show up to talk about the man at the base of this doc. 

Keep On Keepin' On (directed by Alan Hicks)

Clark Terry isn't an immediately recognizable name to those who don't know jazz. Some of those who studied under him—such as Miles Davis and Quincy Jones—are among the biggest names in modern music history. This documentary examines the relationship between the aging Terry and his newest musical pal: Justin Kauflin, a 23 year-old blind piano player. One is hoping to begin a momentous career and one is near the end of one. 

Real Time Analytics