February 18, 2018 / 4:57 PM

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Haters Gonna Hate: Judge Dismisses Copyright Suit Against ‘Shake It Off’, Taylor Swift

 

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Taylor Swift at the Z100's Jingle Ball 2017. The singer triumphed against a copyright infringement case made against the song "Shake It Off" from the album "1989." The plaintiffs still have the option to modify the complaint until the end of the month.  ( Dia Dipasupil | Getty Images )

Taylor Swift was able to shake off her accusers after a judge in California dismissed a copyright infringement case against the pop superstar.

On Tuesday, Feb. 13, Judge Michael W. Fitzgerald ruled that the song "Shake It Off" did not infringe on the lyrics of "Playas Gon' Play," a song performed by the girl group 3LW.

Songwriters Sean Hall and Nathan Butler filed the suit last year, claiming that the chorus of the 1989 track borrowed from their 2001 composition.

For comparison purposes, Swift, in "Shake It Off" declares "The players gonna play, play, play, play, play and the haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate." Meanwhile, in "Playas Gon' Play," the 3LW sings "Playas, they gonna play / And haters, they gonna hate." (Listen below.)

While there are obvious similarities between the two songs, the federal judge does not think that there was a case of infringement.

"By 2001, American popular culture was heavily steeped in the concepts of players, haters, and player haters," he wrote. "The concept of actors acting in accordance with their essential nature is not at all creative; it is banal."

Hall and Butler were given until Feb. 26 to modify their complaints.

"While the Court is extremely skeptical that Plaintiffs will — in a manner consistent with Rule 11 — be able to rehabilitate their copyright infringement claim in an amended complaint," he added, "out of an abundance of forbearance it will give Plaintiffs a single opportunity to try."

"Shake It Off" was released in 2014.

This, of course, is not Swift's first and only legal victory in the past year. The singer also sued a radio DJ for groping last year and won the case. This led to a Time Magazine Person of the Year cover alongside Rose McGowan, Ashley Judd, and others as The Silence Breakers, women who led a revolution against their assailants.

Moving Forward

Now that the 28-year-old is free from copyright infringement accusations (not like she was ever worried), she will continue promoting her new album reputation. She will embark on a world tour and perform in major cities in North America, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand starting May.

She is also set to headline the Biggest Weekend, a music festival organized by the BBC, which will take place in four locations all over the United Kingdom. She will perform at the Swansea venue with her friend Ed Sheeran.

The Biggest Weekend will take place from May 25 to May 28.

 

 

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