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Ryan Adams Releases Hilarious Infomercial for New Album [WATCH]

by Shawn Christ   Sep 8, 2014 16:13 PM EDT

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Facebook, Google and Twitter have circulated some of the most outrageous fake news

The new self-titled Ryan Adams album is not for the birds, or at least that's the message in the artist's new parody infomercial.

In a three-minute YouTube video title "Parakeet," a slew of celebrities and musicians try to find out why Adams' newest effort, which drops tomorrow (Sept. 9), is killing innocent birds. The clip opens up on Gary Shandling fielding a call as the singer's manager from Jeff Garlin, a disgruntled fan whose bird just died from "listening to Ryan Adams new album, which is just such an emotional album."

The clip only gets stranger from there, with scenes of Don Was demanding an album that doesn't kill birds and Bob Mould jamming with Adams in a studio.

Check out the parody video below:

Aside from creating buzz via hilariously awkward infomercials, Adams' first two singles "Gimme Something Good" and "My Wrecking Ball" have fans eagerly awaiting the new album. The artist will make his way over to Europe this week for a handful of fall shows, including a stop at the iTunes Festival in London on Sept. 21 before returning for the U.S. leg of the tour.

Adams recently spoke about bringing everything back to basics for the new album, which will be released through PAX-AM, on NPR.

"When people come to the studio, they can listen to records; we have manual typewriters and stationery and reference books for them to look at, and lots of old-fashioned '60s and '70s pulp magazines," he said. "All kinds of stuff to sort of inspire someone, should they be in the middle of a process and need that."

Adams also talked about working in his own studio, which is located right near the PAX-AM one.

"And I would record my own music in my own place, to the point where I started to amass more songs than I had even made next door," he said. "And they took on a feeling that reminded me of the way that I played, and the kinds of music that I played, when I first started. It felt like starting again. And I knew that I needed to follow that thread."

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